vegan

Spicy Roasted Romanesco with Lemon and Capers

Posted by on Feb 28, 2015 in 21DSD, vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian, Whole 30 | 5 comments

Spicy Roasted Romanesco with Lemon and Capers

Confession time: While I actually love vegetables (hi, Mom!), I tend to get in a rut and eat the same ones over and over again. Although the old standbys (broccoli, cauliflower, green beans, kale, collards, Brussels) have a definite season, here in northern California, they’re always around in grocery stores. (Which I’m not complaining about, of course.) Romanesco, though, is different. It’s a rebel that only shows up a couple of times a year. Based on a quick google search, the season for romanesco is late summer. But based on the bright green spindly heads that are popping up all over, it appears to be in season now, at least somewhere within a reasonable distance from San Francisco. Whether it’s google or real life that’s correct, I’m happy to have it around. It might only be because it’s not around long enough for me to bore of it, but I think it’s my most favorite. It’s definitely my favorite to photograph. Normally, when I make this photogenic veggie, I simply roast it until caramelized and tender, and sprinkle it with sea salt. If you want to keep things simple, you can absolutely leave it at that. But for the sake of posting a recipe with a little more… oomph, I dressed this one up with some heat, brininess and tartness. For those of you who have passed by romanesco due to it’s resemblance to an alien and are wondering what it tastes like: It tastes like a cross between broccoli and cauliflower. I, however, like it more than both of those things. A few simple ingredients are all you need. A little char gives romanesco some great flavor. Spicy Roasted Romanesco with Lemon and Capers prep time: 5 minutes | cook time: 20 minutes | serves: 4    1 head romanesco, cut into florets 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, divided 1/4 teaspoon sea salt 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon lemon zest 1 tablespoon capers, minced 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes freshly ground black pepper Preheat the oven to 425. On a baking sheet, toss the romanesco with the sea salt and half of the olive oil. Roast for 10 minutes, flip, and roast for another 10, or until nicely browned and softened. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine the remaining olive oil, lemon juice, lemon zest, capers, red peppers flakes, capers, and some freshly ground black pepper. Once the romanesco is done, toss with the dressing and serve. PIN this recipe:   All of the links on zenbellycatering.com are for information purposes, however some are affiliate links to books, products or services. Any sponsored posts are clearly labelled as being sponsored content. Some ads on this site are served by ad networks and the advertised products are not necessarily recommended by Zenbelly...

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Wild Mushroom & Parsnip Stuffing

Posted by on Nov 20, 2014 in Thanksgiving, vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian | 6 comments

Wild Mushroom & Parsnip Stuffing

Last week on Facebook, I asked the question: “Any favorite Thanksgiving recipes that you’d love to see cleaned up a bit or made gluten-free or Paleo? I’m in the mood for a challenge, lay ’em on me.” Overwhelmingly, people wanted stuffing. More specifically, grain-free stuffing that wasn’t meat based. Huh. I already have a sweet and savory pork stuffing and a gluten-free sourdough stuffing, both of which I love. But grain-free AND vegetarian? That’s cutting the ingredient options down quite a bit… I figured I could make a simple grain-free bread to use as the stuffing base, but that would mean you’d have to make bread BEFORE making the stuffing, and Thanksgiving is already a pretty intense week, prep-wise. Plus, Any bread recipe I’d be able to whip together this week would be almond flour based, and that would make it off limits to all of my nut-free and AIP readers. Well, I did say I was in the mood for a challenge, didn’t I? Wild Mushroom & Parsnip Stuffing Serves 8-10 at the Thanksgiving table, 4-6 as a single side dish 1 ounce dried porcini mushrooms 1 cup boiling water 1 tablespoon ghee, butter, or coconut oil, melted 2 pounds parsnips, cut into 1″ cubes 3 medium carrots, cut into small dice 3 stalks celery, cut into small dice 1 large onion, cut into small dice 6 ounces crimini mushrooms, cut into small dice 3 cloves garlic, minced 6 leaves fresh sage, minced 3 sprigs fresh thyme, minced 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons arrowroot powder Preheat the oven to 425. In a large bowl, pour the boiling water over the porcini mushrooms and set aside to rehydrate Toss the parsnips with the ghee and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Set on a roasting pan and roast for 20-25 minutes, until golden brown and softened. Meanwhile, heat a large skillet over medium high heat and add the onion, carrot, and celery. Saute for 8-10 minutes, or until softened. Add the crimini mushrooms, garlic, and 1 teaspoon salt. Cook for another 2 minutes, until the mushrooms are softened. Remove from heat. Strain the porcini mushrooms and reserve the liquid. Mince the mushrooms and add them to the skillet along with the minced herbs. To the large bowl with the porcini liquid, add the balsamic vinegar and arrowroot and whisk to combine. Add the roasted parsnips and contents of the skillet to the liquid mixture. Stir to combine. Transfer to a medium baking pan and cook for 30 minutes, uncovered. Allow to sit for 5-10 minutes before serving. All of the links on zenbellycatering.com are for information purposes, however some are affiliate links to books, products or services. Any sponsored posts are clearly labelled as being sponsored content. Some ads on this site are served by ad networks and the advertised products are not necessarily recommended by Zenbelly...

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The Zenbelly Cookbook Sneak Peek: Sesame Shiitake Broccoli

Posted by on Jul 2, 2014 in 21DSD, vegan, Vegetarian | 1 comment

The Zenbelly Cookbook Sneak Peek: Sesame Shiitake Broccoli

The Zenbelly Cookbook, an epicurean’s guide to paleo cuisine is available for preorder! To celebrate the release of my very first cookbook, I will be sharing a recipe from it every week, so you get a sneak peek of what’s to come! And if you’re already excited, you can, of course preorder it HERE. What can you expect from The Zenbelly Cookbook, you ask? Good question! Here are the things I’m most excited about: How To’s The beginning pages of The Zenbelly Cookbook are chock full of tips and techniques, complete with step by step photos to go with them. You’ll learn everything from how to source quality ingredients, to how to hold a knife, to how to cut up a whole chicken. Photos 2 per recipe! Each recipe in the book has an ingredients photo (like the one below) and a plated photo (like the one above) I had so much fun doing both of these shoots, but mostly the ingredients shots. There’s something about organizing things neatly that brings me zen. Plus, I love how it gives a visual “before”, so you can see all of the ingredients you’ll be using. I hope you love them, to Recipes Duh, I know. But I’m so excited to share these recipes with you. While there are some favorites from the blog that just had to be included (like NY Style Pizza Crust and No Joke Chocolate Cake), about 100 out of the 110 recipes are brand new. Menus I’ve included several menus for you, including an adventurous Thanksgiving spread, and a fancy multiple course dinner party menu that you can make 98% of ahead of time. Imagine how impressed your guests will be when you present them with an incredible dinner, all the while being nothing short of cool and collected. HOW DO YOU DO IT?! (Don’t worry, your secret’s safe with me!) I’m very excited to be sharing these little sneak peeks with you, and will plan on posting one every Wednesday for the next few months. So stay tuned, and subscribe if you don’t want to miss a post! (Don’t worry, I’ll never share or sell your email address, and the only time you’ll hear from me is when I post a new recipe, or have news directly relating to this blog or the book) This week, I’m sharing my recipe for Sesame Shiitake Broccoli. As a kid, I only liked tolerated broccoli 2 ways: smothered with cheese, or stir-fried in some kind of salty brown sauce. The latter is still one of my go-to ways to cook up this crucifer, and I’ve given it a paleo update, and added some shiitake mushrooms for a boost of umami. Make sure you don’t skimp on the sesame seeds; they really do make the dish! sesame shiitake broccoli prep time: 10 minutes | cook time: 15 minutes | serves: 4 2 tablespoons coconut oil 8 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems removed and halved 1 1/2 pounds broccoli, cut into florets 1 (1-inch) piece fresh ginger, peeled and grated ¼ cup coconut aminos ¼ cup water ½ teaspoon finely ground sea salt 1 teaspoon black and/or white sesame seeds • Heat the oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. • Once shimmering, add the mushrooms and saute for 1 to 2 minutes, or until they soften. Remove from the pan with a slotted spoon and set aside. • Add the broccoli to the pan and cook for 8 minutes, stirring occasionally until browned and softened. • Add the ginger and cook another 2 minutes. • Add the coconut aminos and water and continue to cook for 2 to...

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apple sauce

Posted by on Nov 12, 2013 in condiments & sauces, vegan | 0 comments

apple sauce

Almost too simple for an actual recipe, homemade apple sauce is a real treat. Peeled and diced apples go into a pot, and pretty much cook themselves. You can leave it chunky or hit it with an immersion blender if you like it smooth.  homemade apple sauce makes about 1 quart 2 pounds apples* (about 8 medium) 1 cinnamon stick, optional 1/4 cup water, if needed peel and dice your apples and place in a medium sauce pan. Add the cinnamon stick, if using. Slowly cook, covered, over a low flame for 40-50 minutes, or until the apples are cooked. Check and stir occasionally. The apples should release their own liquid and basically cook themselves. If at any point there’s any sticking to the bottom of the pan, add the water. If you prefer a smooth apple sauce, puree in a blender, food processor, or with an immersion blender. Chill before serving. * Any kind of apples will do, so feel free to use your favorite kind. If you prefer a chunky apple sauce, using 2 varieties of apples will be more likely to yield that result.                       All of the links on zenbellycatering.com are for information purposes, however some are affiliate links to books, products or services. Any sponsored posts are clearly labelled as being sponsored content. Some ads on this site are served by ad networks and the advertised products are not necessarily recommended by Zenbelly...

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Smoked Squash Hummus

Posted by on Oct 25, 2013 in Appetizers, Paleo, Snacks, vegan, Vegetarian | 9 comments

Smoked Squash Hummus

This recipe is part of my review of the Blendtec Designer Series Blender with Twister Jar. To enter to win one for yourself, click the image below! This giveaway is now closed.  I can’t take credit for the genius of this recipe. I found my inspiration for it in Where There’s Smoke by Barton Seaver. The original recipe calls for cooking the squash in a bed of hot embers, which sounds downright dreamy. But I recognize that not everyone has hot embers at their disposal, so this method might not be practical for all. If you do, please go make the recipe exactly as he wrote it. Skip the baguette, obviously, but if you eat the occasional gluten-free sourdough, order yourself some Bread SRSLY. SRSLY. The ingredients are super clean, and this stuff is legit, made the right way right here in San Francisco. If you’re local, check their site for Good Eggs delivery options and local markets that carry it. And if you’re not, you’re in luck because they recently started shipping their sourdough breads all over the country. I swear I don’t get paid to say any of the above. I don’t even get free bread! I just really appreciate the fact that there’s a good option for when I feel like jumping off the paleo wagon and having a damn good sando. Back to the matter at hand: Hummus, sans garbanzos.  I made this recipe for the first time for the Fallon Hills Ranch dinner I did last month. It was part of the second course, which was homemade fresh beef sausage, smoked squash hummus, fennel kraut, shaved apples, and micro greens. Yet another example of just how tough it is to eat paleo; it’s just so restrictive. Poor us. And if you’re still sad, because now you have HUMMUS, but no PITA BREAD, dry your eye. Because Predominantly Paleo has grain-free pita for you. Here we are in action, plating it up: When I made this hummus for the dinner, I threw it in the smoker for an hour, and then roasted it until it was super soft. But I wanted to even further adapt this loveliness for those of you who would like to prepare the entire dish from the comfort of your kitchen. Roasting the squash in the oven with smoked paprika gives it the essence of smokiness that you’d get from roasting it in embers. Not the full effect, but it’s still delicious. smoked squash hummus   For the squash 3 pounds squash, diced in one inch pieces (about one medium butternut, or your favorite hard squash) 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon smoked paprika For the hummus 1 C tahini 1/4 C lemon juice 1 C olive oil 1/8 t chipotle for a kick, or paprika for mild Preheat oven to 425. Slice the squash(s) in half and scoop out the seeds. Rub with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt and smoked paprika. Place on a baking sheet. Roast squash for 45 minutes to one hour, or until very soft. Once cool enough to handle, scoop out the squash into the twister jar of your Blendtec.* Add the tahini, lemon juice, and chipotle or paprika. Blend until smooth, using the twister top to keep everything moving. Drizzle in the olive oil, and continue to blend until very smooth. Season to taste with additional salt, paprika and/or cayenne, and lemon juice. Serve with fresh veggies and/or grain-free everything crackers   * If you don’t have a high powered blender, you can make this recipe in a food processor. All...

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Grilled Pineapple Salsa

Posted by on Apr 22, 2013 in condiments & sauces, Paleo, potluck, vegan, Vegetarian, Whole 30 | 5 comments

Grilled Pineapple Salsa

Simon and I started a Whole 30 this month. Started being the operative word. First, let me just say that I think it is an excellent program, and I think that everyone should do it at least once, and ideally several times a year. Many people do a Whole 30 and it turns into a Whole Forever; they go strict paleo and never look back. That is awesome, and I tip my hat to those who do. As for us, we had every intention of finishing what we started and making April a month of clean(er) eating and no drinking. Just like when we did The 21 Day Sugar Detox, we felt good about the fact that we were taking on the challenge together. The first week, I filled our fridge with food,  and we were ready to rock the Whole 30. We made it 19 days. I’m not going to make any excuses about why we stopped. We just kind of did. I don’t think you should follow our example, but I do think you should always go with your gut in regards to your health and happiness. For those of you who don’t eat with us on a regular basis (which is just about all of you), Simon and I eat really clean in general. Our house is 100% gluten-free. We buy a week’s worth of grass fed meat, pastured eggs, and organic fruits and vegetables at the farmers market every week. We (pft; I) cook at home for 99% of the meals we eat. Maybe 99.7%. Our “cheats” are heavy cream, grain-free baked goods, sushi rolls, and a drink now and then. Once in a while I’ll eat something totally off the rails like a gluten-free dessert that one of my baker friends made. That’s us. I’m happy with that. We will do this again, and finish it, and we will do more sugar detoxes too. But for now, we’ll stick with our happy healthy lifestyle that includes a little dairy, almond flour muffins, and tequila. None of this is meant to read as an excuse, I just feel the need to give you some background on us. And if you’re about to leave a nasty comment about how we failed at being paleo, please allow me to refer you to this article, which while not written by me, sums up my feelings on the matter quite nicely. All of this has nothing to do with the recipe in this post, except for the fact that Simon developed an uncanny addiction to pineapple during his Whole 19. So when I decided to make tacos the other night, it only made sense to make pineapple salsa. Grilled Pineapple Salsa 1 ripe pineapple 1/2 an onion (2 thick round slices) 1 large jalapeño 1/2 teaspoon cumin 1/2 teaspoon coriander 2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons lime juice Fire up your grill to medium-high. Trim the pineapple: Lay the pineapple on it’s side and cut off the top and bottom. Stand it up on one end and cut downward, along the contour of the pineapple, removing the skin but leaving as much flesh as possible. Keeping it in this position, continue to cut off 1/2-3/4 inch slabs of fruit. They don’t have to be even, you’ll be dicing after they’re grilled. Peel the onion and cut 2 thick slices out of the middle. (in the same direction you would cut off the top and bottom) Leave the rings intact. If you have a skewer handy, use it to hold the rings together to make for easier...

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